Hydroponic Garden – Maguire McMahon ’20

In preparation for the Year In Review and the BCGLP Symposium on May 23rd, the EDI Fellows put together blurbs about their projects to accompany their posters and presentations.  We are featuring one every day until May 23rd.  We hope you can join us. Here is Maguire McMahon ’20 describing the combined work by all the EDI Fellows. 

Maguire McMahon

Jarod Haley ‘20 of the Chesapeake Bay Fellows approached us to design and build a hydroponic garden, a soilless form of growing plants. The 2020 and 2019 EDI Fellows tackled the design challenge in three groups to develop three separate designs. My group’s plan was a hexagonal structure with an effective drainage system and constructed from cedar wood and acrylic plastic. The EDI Fellows then took this winning design and built two different prototypes to test our ideas. We intend to build the full-scale structure over the summer.

Airtight Acrylic Box – Leah Smith ’20 and Nik Yanek-Chrones ’20

In preparation for the Year In Review and the BCGLP Symposium on May 23rd, the EDI Fellows put together blurbs about their projects to accompany their posters and presentations.  We are featuring one every day until May 23rd.  We hope you can join us. Here is Nik Yanek-Chrones ’20 and Leah Smith ’20 about their work on airtight acrylic boxes for Yson Wittmann ’19 with Sarah Haugh ’20 and Maguire McMahon ’20. 

This year, Tyson Wittmann ‘19 approached the 2020 EDI cohort and asked if we could design and construct clear, airtight boxes for an experiment. The experiment’s goal is to discern whether or not the temperature change from an enclosed greenhouse gas exposed to sunlight is great enough to generate electricity via a turbine. The greenhouse gases would be released into airtight acrylic boxes that contain a bluetooth temperature sensor. We took on this challenge and made an acrylic box with a removable lid. Our cohort was eager and constructed prototypes. We faced a few challenges such as issues with rubber to acrylic adhesion and creating an airtight seal. From this, we have learned the importance of research, prototypes, and team communication, as well as gaining the experience of working with professionals to cater to a client. However, through a combination of local resources and Norfolk Academy faculty advice, we found solutions.

Inertia Demo – Olivia Danielson ’21 and Christopher Asuncion ’21

In preparation for the Year In Review and the BCGLP Symposium on May 23rd, the EDI Fellows put together blurbs about their projects to accompany their posters and presentations.  We are featuring one every day until May 23rd.  We hope you can join us. Here is Olivia Danielson ’21 and Christopher Asuncion ’21 about their work with Dr. Call on 3D printed inertia models. 

Olivia Danielson ’21

Christopher and I are making six 3D-printed models, five cylinders and a sphere, to demonstrate inertia in Dr. Call’s physics class. The challenge is to design the shapes to have the same mass. To make sure each of the masses are the same, we will test print smaller versions of the objects and then weigh them, making sure that all the shapes, except for one, has the same masses. After we make adjustments, we will print the full scale objects.  Our work will be seen by future physic classes at NA.

 

 

Christopher Asuncion ’21

Literacy Fellows’ Book Press – Charlie Walker ’21 and AJ Keels ’21

In preparation for the Year In Review and the BCGLP Symposium on May 23rd, the EDI Fellows put together blurbs about their projects to accompany their posters and presentations.  We are featuring one every day until May 23rd.  We hope you can join us. Here is AJ Keels ’21 and Charlie Walker ’21 about building the Book Press with the 2021 EDI Fellows.

Organization of Materials by 2021 EDI Fellows. From Left to Right: Olivia Danielson, AJ Keels, Christopher Asuncion, Caitlin Johnson

Our first project as EDI Fellows was to construct a hydraulically-powered book press for the Literacy Fellows. During the construction of the device, after the plate of the press was inserted into the device, we discovered that it was not level. The group used a magnetic leveler and found that the plate was not high enough. To fix this, we inserted wooden planes to raise the plate. This was the ultimate solution to our engineering complication. After working through this objective, the final book press was a success.

Charlie Walker, Class of 2021

Saw Guard – Caitlin Johnson ’21 and Keon Tavakoli ’21

In preparation for the Year In Review and the BCGLP Symposium on May 23rd, the EDI Fellows put together blurbs about their projects to accompany their posters and presentations.  We are featuring one every day until May 23rd.  We hope you can join us. Here is Caitlin Johnson ’21 and Keon Tavakoli ’21 about their work with AJ Keels ’21 and Charlie Walker ’21 on the table saw guard for Mr. Barton.

2021 EDI Fellows. From Left to Right: Christopher Asuncion, Olivia Danielson, Caitlin Johnson, Keon Tavakoli, AJ Keels, and Charlie Walker.

Mr. Barton approached EDI with a complication regarding his table saw, specifically the DADO blade, a large saw used to cut objects. The current harbor, in which the normal blade resides, is too narrow for the DADO blade to occupy; therefore, we designed a new, wider port, in which the DADO blade will have the ability to inhabit. The guard was too large to be printed with one CAD design, so we split the guard in half, designing two prints. The halves will be secured using an interlocking mechanism, placed on the edges of the halves, to hold them together.

CAD Design for the Table Saw Guard

 

NA Charging Station – Patrick McElroy ’19

Patrick McElroy ’19

In preparation for the Year In Review and the BCGLP Symposium on May 23rd, the EDI Fellows put together blurbs about their projects to accompany their posters and presentations.  We are featuring one every day until May 23rd.  We hope you can join us. Here is Patrick McElroy ’19 about the NA Charging Station with Chai Hibbert ’19.

This year, I have focused on giving students the opportunity to charge their devices at school. To this end, I modified a wooden shelving unit to be able to charge devices from iPads to computers to Apple and Android phones. My project let me get hands-on in creating my solution and has allowed me to meet with Norfolk Academy staff, who are currently helping me bring my idea into reality for the Upper School.

 

ECU Subluxation Wrist Brace – Connor Holland ’19 and Sebastian Singh ’19

Sebastian Singh ’19
Connor Holland ’19

In preparation for the Year In Review and the BCGLP Symposium on May 23rd, the EDI Fellows put together blurbs about their projects to accompany their posters and presentations.  We are featuring one every day until May 23rd.  We hope you can join us. Here is Connor Holland ’19 and Sebastian Singh ’19 about their 3D-Printed ECU Subluxation Wrist Brace. 

Sebastian Singh ‘19 and Connor Holland ‘19 design a 3D printed wrist brace to help patients with ECU subluxation, a malady related to incorrect sliding of forearm muscles. Here is the evolution of their prototypes from prototype 1 (P1) to P3 to P5. With each iteration, small changes are made to the design to improve comfort and support.

Over the course of the year, we have been working on a solution to a medical problem called Extensor Carpi Ulnaris (ECU) Subluxation, in which the ECU Tendon snaps over the ulna causing possible tears in the tendon sheath. The problem we found with common bracing solutions for this affliction was that they were not reliable or comfortable. Using a flexible 3D-printed material, we designed a bracing solution that allows for almost full range of motion and provides comfortable support. Our next step is to meet with Orthopedic specialists and test our prototypes with patients.